Why the U.N. can never bring peace

If you ask people what the U.N. stands for, most would probably answer “peace,” or at least the world’s best hope of peace. For millions around the world, a U.N.-fostered peace is more than a hope; it is an inevitable necessity. They put their full passion into ending war – or as a recent Walter Cronkite PBS series framed it – into “Avoiding Armageddon.” The horror of war is what galvanizes them. Across America, Cronkite’s anti-war message is so commonly accepted that public schools will no doubt show “Avoiding Armageddon” to their students, promoting the peace movement by teaching the reality of war, made frighteningly vivid by the series. Now how could anyone reasonably question Walter Cronkite’s hope of global peace? After all, even Winston Churchill said it’s better to jaw, jaw, jaw than war, war, war. So let’s get the world around a table, these people say, and talk, talk, talk about problems until “peace” is the only solution. Sounds good, but the United Nations is not about “talk” as its world court indicates. … Continue Reading

The 1 weapon essential for victory

No one can doubt the fierce commitment of radical Islamists who are willing to kill themselves in waging this war of terror on America. But as the war heats up, both in the Middle East and here at home where terror attacks are expected, the world will be watching to see if average American citizens can demonstrate a similar will to fight. Experts know the odds are against us. Ironically, despite our “superpower” status, military authorities worldwide consider us an underdog in this battle of wills, something made clear by former military history professor Lt. Col. Anthony Kern (USAF, Ret.) in his famous “Open Letter to Americans,” written right after the Sept. 11 attack and later quoted by the Defense Department. In it, Kern warns Americans that the post 9-11 “flag waving and patriotism” could end fairly quickly in the face of continued terrorism. “It is generally acknowledged that America lacks the stomach for a long fight,” says Kern. “We need only look as far back as Vietnam, when North Vietnamese Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap … Continue Reading

Homeland Defense: A Call To The Churches

The most perilous attitude Americans could have right now is overconfidence. There is a good reason the Bush administration continues to urge vigilance, despite our success in Afghanistan. “We have to assume,” a senior White House official told the Washington Post in December, “that since there were cells prior to Sept. 11 buried in the United States for some time, there might be others. This is the most dangerous fact for American security right now.” It should be remembered also that even without Afghanistan as a safe haven, al-Qaida cells can still reproduce. “Tens of thousands of foreign extremists have already learned military and terror skills and moved on,” Newsweek recently reported. “Hundreds if not thousands of hard-core militants are still at large, including many who were involved in previous terrorist operations. They know how to raise their own money, even if al-Qaida’s funds are blocked, and they have knowledge that can be passed on to other extremists.” But the real danger lies beyond the mere presence of al-Qaida cells; it’s what those terrorists are … Continue Reading